Missouri Sheriffs

See Missouri Sheriffs and search records to find out inmate locator information, who is in jail, perform free inmate searches, lookups, jail view, get arrest and criminal records and history, mugshots, warrant searches for past and current inmate booking blotters and releases.


Sheriffs by County

Adair County Andrew County Atchison County Audrain County Barry County Barton County Bates County Bollinger County Boone County Buchanan County Butler County Caldwell County Callaway County Camden County Cape Girardeau County Carroll County Carter County Cass County Cedar County Chariton County Christian County Clark County Clay County Clinton County Cole County Cooper County Crawford County Dade County Dallas County Daviess County DeKalb County Dent County Douglas County Dunklin County Franklin County Gasconade County Gentry County Greene County Grundy County Harrison County Henry County Hickory County Holt County Howard County Howell County Iron County Jackson County Jasper County Jefferson County Johnson County Knox County Laclede County Lafayette County Lawrence County Lewis County Lincoln County Linn County Livingston County Macon County Madison County Maries County Marion County McDonald County Mercer County Miller County Mississippi County Moniteau County Monroe County Montgomery County Morgan County New Madrid County Newton County Nodaway County Oregon County Osage County Ozark County Pemiscot County Perry County Pettis County Phelps County Pike County Platte County Polk County Pulaski County Putnam County Ralls County Randolph County Ray County Reynolds County Ripley County Saline County Schuyler County Scotland County Scott County Shannon County Shelby County St. Charles County St. Clair County St. Francois County St. Louis County Ste. Genevieve County Stoddard County Stone County Sullivan County Taney County Texas County Vernon County Warren County Washington County Wayne County Webster County Worth County Wright County

What is a sheriff?

Sheriffs are elected law enforcement officials who operate in each county. Their responsibilities are similar to police officers, except with wider territorial jurisdiction. Sheriffs can provide public, searchable records, including criminal records, arrest records, and in some cases court documents and records.

What does a sheriff do?

The sheriff’s department has many responsibilities, which may vary widely by county. In some counties, the sheriff’s responsibilities are limited to operating county jails and providing courtroom security and record management.

In other counties, the sheriff and his deputies may be responsible for patrolling roadways, investigating crimes, crowd control at public events, delivering official documents in civil cases, searching court records, and evicting tenants from rental properties. Regardless of their specific duties, sheriffs have the legal authority to investigate and arrest anyone that commits a crime in their jurisdiction, regardless of whether he or she has a prior police record or not.

In counties with multiple police departments, a sheriff's department serves as the leading law enforcement agency and coordinates the efforts of other agencies during major criminal investigations or public disasters. In small towns and municipalities, the sheriff is often responsible for all law enforcement and public order duties. And, in a large county, the sheriff is often responsible for patrolling highways, traffic control, and enforcement of traffic offenses such as speeding violations, DUI and DWI arrests, and may also impound vehicles.

The sheriff and his or her deputies also investigate serious crimes such as burglary, homicide, arson, and other personal and property crimes. Many sheriffs operate special units devoted to investigating specific types of crimes or providing services not offered by local police departments. In many cases, these special units focus on investigating and apprehending criminals who prey on local citizens but operate beyond the reach of local police departments.

They also have fugitive-apprehension units focused on finding criminals with serious jail records who have been released on bail bonds and committed other crimes. For example, the sheriff may have a victim services unit that provides outreach services to domestic abuse victims or an Internet crimes unit focused on identifying and apprehending online pedophiles and deviant predators, even those operating across jurisdictional lines.

Since sheriffs also work closely with district attorneys, they may be called to present evidence (including arrest and criminal records) during depositions and testify during a defendant’s trial.

The sheriff also coordinates with federal law enforcement agencies on local and regional investigations. These include the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), Department of Homeland Security (DHS), Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF), and Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA).

The sheriff is held to the same high standard of conduct as other law enforcement officials. A sheriff is responsible for making that each suspect understands his or her constitutional rights during questioning, and must also comply with all Constitutional protections, such as the Fourth Amendment's restrictions on unreasonable search and seizure.

Where can I find sheriffs?

Most sheriff departments have one central office, and stations strategically located throughout the county, providing access to the inmate, court and arrest records they maintain. You can find the nearest sheriff office in this directory.